Keddie Oak: Play Your Fave Song Willow, Joan Armatrading

Re: Keddie Oak: Play Your Fave Song Willow, Joan Armatra

Postby dmac » Thu Nov 23, 2017 3:59 am

This may take most to step back a few paces and bite tongue.

I bought the blue sky white cloud "Live Peace in Toronto" and nothing kicked ass better than "Don't Worry Kyoko"!



I'd take this tape and play it LOUD AS FUCK while I worked.

I took it to college and people loved it before I said YOKO

This band was built overnight, rehearsed a couple times on the flight from London to Toronto. Alan White from Yes hung up on Lennon the first time, thinking it was a joke. No, John Lennon hired him because he'd seen him play the night before.

This band caught something special in DON'T WORRY KYOKO,

Eric Clapton
John Lennon
Klaus Voorman
Alan White
Yoko
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Re: Keddie Oak: Play Your Fave Song Willow, Joan Armatra

Postby dmac » Thu Nov 23, 2017 4:28 am

One guy directed all the vidz in this chain. The songs are great, but the vidz take them to another level. This director is making feature films now.













My fave #1 is so cewl cuz Soik set it up and ran it, ONE SHOT MOTHERFUCKER>

and his heart is so fucking into it!

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Re: Keddie Oak: Play Your Fave Song Willow, Joan Armatra

Postby dmac » Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:02 am

Robin,

follow the link and find the voices and names. It's a tough call. Even those responsible didn't know it until I played it for them.

Just listen ad take notes on who you hear.

Then listen again at how fucking perfect the lyrics are.

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Re: Keddie Oak: Play Your Fave Song Willow, Joan Armatra

Postby robin » Thu Nov 23, 2017 3:56 pm

Thatcher, Thatcher the milk snatcher.

I remember we had mini bottles with straws in the playground and the teachers made sure you drank all the milk - even if you were allergic - as they did back then. Proper glass bottles they were too. This is prior to 1979, when 'Managed Decline' was still a twinkle in St Francis of Downing Street's eye. I didn't need the free milk, we were in a 'Barratt' house, which was a step up from the council housing that a couple of my friends lived in. But some kids I knew were on social security and would really have needed that milk. Who snatches milk from the bones of developing children? Maggie! I miss hating her.

I wrote a big long post and it disappeared. I'm thinking of the gist: Weezer, classic song. They had so much promise, but whenever I get excited about a band...they disappoint me quicker than bands used to, in my youth. I mean bands seemed to have had at least two or three good albums in them back then. These days...they've got no longevity. You get a promising single... I'm sure it's not just me...

Sonic Youth I could never get on with. Beastie Boys: what I loved about 'Sabotage' was the heroic whine at the start, "I caaan't staaand it." I wake up every morning like that, which is why I'm on meds.

Breeders: Yeah, I loved 'Canonball' and they did a good version of 'Happiness is a Warm Gun' too. She's got a great voice, Kim Deal, in her own little way. Pixies I saw on their 'Doolittle' tour in Manchester, 1989 I think it was. They were absolutely fantastic, best band I've ever seen ( having said that, I haven't seen that many ). I'll piss you off and say they were just as good as the record. But their records were never that polished, so that's OK. We revered Charles Kitteridge Thompson III in our house. Until last year when my brother played me 'The Gun Club' and I thought, "How did Jeffrey Lee Pierce ever hold his tongue all these years?"



The 'Sara' thing; I've been rumbled then. My real name is Sarah, but I just love the Stevie Nicks song, it's not that I'm self obsessed, honest. Though I am self obsessed. Honest.

No, I like the whole 'Desire' album, mainly for the energy of 'Hurricane' and the doomed romance (I'm a drama queen) of 'One More Cup of Coffee'. I love the sound they got on that record. He used a female musician in the studio and not just as window dressing forthe 'live' shows ( a-hem...Bryan Ferry ) and the female violinist MAKES it, for me - as well as Emmylou's presence. Dylan's 'Sara' I found overwrought and insincere; just that you were the love of my life sentiment. I got invested in the soap opera of it all. I'd read that he used to bring down groupies for breakfast while his wife was sitting there. The love rat! I believe what I read in magazines and you can't stop me. So it rang hollow to me. When I listened to 'Sara' I just thought, "Riiiight. Bye Feliciano!"

Dylan as a Christian: Well like many others I've wondered if he's been trolling us all these years, but who knows if he's sincere? He did sing in 'Political World' (from 'Oh Mercy') "Climb into the frame and shout God's name but you're not even sure what it is.." which signified confusion of the spiritual kind.

Warren Zevon: I'm embarrassed to say I only got round to listening to that song a couple of months ago. His hair was perfect etc. Yeah, it's great. There's something so effective about those lyrics. They really jive with the spring in the step of the keyboards.

Yoko: I always defend her on 'youtube' because everyone else's hatred of her is insane. Their reasoning seems to be that she's wasn't even a looker. I mean who gives a shit if her tits sagged? John was homely. If he were a plumber...You have to remind them that whatever Yoko Ono was, she was not Susan Atkins. They seem to be confused about her crimes against society. 'Walking on Thin Ice' is a classic, for me. And that 'Kyoko' live performance had great energy. Would I listen to a whole album by Yoko Ono though? Would I fuck!

Eric Clapton never looked like a rock star did he? He was handsome, but he always looked kind of embarrassed to be there, in those early performances. Like he was the band's accountant or something; they'd given him free tickets and he'd ended up on stage by mistake.

I don't trust anyone who doesn't like ABBA. I love it when Frida sings, I love it when Agnetha sings, but when their voices blend together. it's sublime. There are a few great lost ABBA singles and this is one of them. It's the most elegant disco song ever, I think. I love the bass and Benny's elegant piano too.




I'm sorry you're feeling ill.
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Re: Keddie Oak: Play Your Fave Song Willow, Joan Armatra

Postby dmac » Thu Nov 23, 2017 5:36 pm



The very first time I caught a bus in London, a drunk at the queue started raving out of the blue about Mags. When I got on and sat down, the elderly lady sitting next to me said, "yer a Yank?" and proceeded, with no prompting, to launch into a nice-and-tidy full-throttle endorsement of Thatcher.

It was at the start of the Falkland war, and the place I lived in Hampstead... the TV rooms were full at newstime, with wonderful and loud derision whenever Maggie was mentioned.

When she died, I said she and Reagan- of ALL people- deserved to die of dementia. The way they stole from the poor to topple any balance of wealth is evil and unforgivable. I just wish she'd been taken to one of the care facilities she'd shuttered and left there to fend for herself.

Ever heard of the band, Jellyfish? I know a couple of the guys, and one of them - his mom died of dementia, so he took my comment wrong. He of all people should understand my sentiment that what Maggie did was so unspeakable and hate-filled that it was acceptable she should die in such an appalling fashion. But I come from the mindset that people who do awful things deserve IMMEDIATE reprisal. None of this afterlife 'gates of heaven' karma horse shit. For instance, instead of the death penalty, I prefer a long, miserable life in solitary, with just enough interaction to keep them borderline sane.
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Re: Keddie Oak: Play Your Fave Song Willow, Joan Armatra

Postby Mikey71 » Thu Nov 23, 2017 10:39 pm


I hope I did this right. Anyway I love this group especially front woman Brittany Howard. She's not what you expect to see, she's not real fashionable she looks like local librarian or something but she FEELS the music and pulls u in. As how it relates to me... well I guess I ain't the same anymore either and that's life. We are constantly evolving. I don't necessarily know if I'm better than I was before I'm certainly more knowledgeable which in turn has changed me. Yet I wonder is ignorance bliss? Cuz these thoughts that plague my mind keep me awake at night.
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Re: Keddie Oak: Play Your Fave Song Willow, Joan Armatra

Postby robin » Fri Nov 24, 2017 1:55 am

dmac: Wishing Dementia on Thatcher: I would plead unique circumstances. The guy from 'Jellyfish' should have understood. I've had loved ones die from dementia and I wouldn't have been offended. That being said, we should all count to three before we post online. You should count to thirty thousand and three.

mikey71: Yeah, from where I'm languishing, you posted the link correctly. I kept doing it wrong and then I saw the guy's tutorial online and he pointed out that the 's' in the htttps url is often problematic, so you just delete the letter 'S' from the link. Alabama Shakes were gonna be my next choice! 'Hang Loose'. That girl has got some pipes. She doesn't look like a Brittany either - which is cool, somehow.


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Re: Keddie Oak: Play Your Fave Song Willow, Joan Armatra

Postby Mikey71 » Fri Nov 24, 2017 3:42 pm

robin wrote:dmac: Wishing Dementia on Thatcher: I would plead unique circumstances. The guy from 'Jellyfish' should have understood. I've had loved ones die from dementia and I wouldn't have been offended. That being said, we should all count to three before we post online. You should count to thirty thousand and three.

mikey71: Yeah, from where I'm languishing, you posted the link correctly. I kept doing it wrong and then I saw the guy's tutorial online and he pointed out that the 's' in the htttps url is often problematic, so you just delete the letter 'S' from the link. Alabama Shakes were gonna be my next choice! 'Hang Loose'. That girl has got some pipes. She doesn't look like a Brittany either - which is cool, somehow.

Thanks!
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Re: Keddie Oak: Play Your Fave Song Willow, Joan Armatra

Postby dmac » Thu Nov 30, 2017 5:52 am

JEP wrote: My all time favorite song is Talk About the Passion, so ethereal musically but strong lyrically.


There's one early REM song that took a friend from his mindless Ozzy trip to hearing a real band. It's when Stipe intentionally used multiple takes just to layer the syllables of one single word of a lyric. When I played it over and over to my friend, he was floored.

Name the song where Stipe uses multiple takes and tracks to sing one word.
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Re: Keddie Oak: Play Your Fave Song Willow, Joan Armatra

Postby dmac » Sat Dec 09, 2017 10:57 am

In dark mockery of the K4 Koverup, here's Randy Newman well before Disney stole his magic,



Here's another song by Randy, who I consider one of the best singer/songwriters since Americans made music. Baltimore, it's a real and plaintive dirge by a victim. It's on the Little Criminals album which, apart from the throwaway joke "Short People", is wall-to-wall brilliance.



When Harry Nilsson was bathing in the success of his landmark album, top hits, and Beatles endorsements, he chose to do a cover album. Nilsson was KNOWN as a writer and arranger, ffs, so this must have been a firm "FukU" to the business. No, he quickly wrapped an album of him rearrangeing and covering songs. But he didn't do much re-arranging, and all the songs were by Randy Newman.

This is kinda like the Holy Grail of pop music, where Harry is considered GOD at all the award ceremonies, and he passes the torch and recognition back to Randy Newman. Never happened before or since.
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Re: Keddie Oak: Play Your Fave Song Willow, Joan Armatra

Postby chrisAAA » Sun Dec 10, 2017 12:03 pm



Nick Drake, "Time Has Told Me"

The band I was the singer of embarked on an ambitious European tour in May 1998. I call it ambitious because we were not very well known outside a small scene in our own country and likely had no reason to expect that anyone in Europe or the UK would be interested in seeing us We flew to Frankfurt, Germany from SFO and our bass player, who's from the Philippines was promptly sent back to the US due to him not having a proper visa. Our luggage was also lost.

We spent five weeks in a Fiat splitter van with a first-time tour manager and a driver that hated wearing shoes. Most of the time was spent staring at amazing scenery through the glass, periodically interrupted with short stops to carry our gear into some dingy venue -- a bar in Belgium, a dirt-floored basement in Switzerland, a youth center under the shadow of Mt. Vesuvius in Italy-- where we'd play our dumb little songs to handfuls of kids that had no idea of who we were.

Though I was in my early 20's, this was my first time in Europe, and I was with some of my favorite people in the world at the time, I was determined to be miserable. I kept this Nick Drake song on repeat for the whole of the trip. At the time, I'd obsess over songs and listen to them on an endless loop, thanks to the miracle of my still very novel at the time personal CD player. Though I love all kinds of music and was playing in a noisy rock band, it was always the plaintive songs I wanted to hear over and over. Songs like Pretty Things' 'Loneliest Person in the World," the Beach Boys' "Surf's Up" or even Scott Walker singing Randy Newman's "I Don't Want to Hear It Anymore."

This song was my soundtrack to this particular adventure. I'd stare out the van window at the beauty of the French countryside or some other otherworldly landscape, sigh, frown and write handwritten letters to friends back home, while Nick sang about a "rare, rare find" that was also "a troubled cure for a troubled mind." There was something immensely satisfying to listen to how Nick's acoustic guitar succumbed to Richard Thompson's twangy electric lead and then ended, only to hear the soft strums of the song start again; a testament to the enduring nature of the feelings the song is about.

"Time has told me you came with the dawn
A soul with no footprint, a rose with no thorn
Your tears they tell me there's really no way
Of ending your troubles with things you can say"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ty2q1sClQCM
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Re: Keddie Oak: Play Your Fave Song Willow, Joan Armatra

Postby dmac » Fri Dec 15, 2017 10:08 pm

Strangely enough, the night before your Drake post, I was transferring much of his music from my backup data DVDs so I could burn some off for a friend (and forum member), as well as put it onto the mp3 player I recently stumbled across. Although Nick's career was like a shooting star, I've managed to collect far more than the scant three albums he put out while alive and the extra tracks and alternate mixes found on some of the compilations.

Nick's name and legend found me long before any of his music. I still came into earshot far too late in life. The first song I had was on a DJ-only sampler from Island. I refused to listen to it, as I was pissed that he'd killed himself and didn't want to taint my judgment by a lone song. It wasn't until I watched 'Ratcatcher' which features 'Cello Song', until I heard him.

I had no clue what he sounded like, but I somehow knew that had to be the legendary Nick Drake. That happened to me before, too. I''d never heard Jim Carroll before, but instinctively knew it was him when he came on the radio in Los Angeles. Speaking of LA (the culture-filled state, not the cesspool city), I was at a party in college where the host had somehow heard of my record collection, eclectic tastes, and knowledge, so he put me to a challenge: He'd play DJ, and I was to name as much as I could about the song. Like "Baba O'Reilly", released in the US in 1971 as an extract from the proposed Lifehouse project, Townshend's followup to Tommy. I knew the title was a joking ref to Trouser's Meher beliefs, where it was recorded, that Glyn Johns produced it, but Keith Moon produced the violin parts. That type of answer is what he wanted. When he put on some really wild Nawlins piano-driven jam, I knew it had to be Professor Longhair... even though I'd not yet ever heard him play, much less found any of his music.

Anyway, I knew that was Nick Drake. But it wasn't until I took a date to see 'Serendipity' that I heard another Drake song- Northern Sky, which happens to be the cut from the aforementioned sampler disc. At that point, I decided to again actively search for Nick's music. Trust me, where I lived throughout the 80s and 90s, Nick Drake was on the radar of maybe .3% of the public, his music never stocked in stores. So I downloaded a couple albums. I was quickly addicted, but it still took a while to find his home tapes. Tanworth-In-Arden (1 & 2), The Complete Home Recordings, Second Grace, etc.

Like many, I found the intrusion of string arrangements and the ensuing overproduction off-putting, often obscuring the wonderful material beneath. My fave is Pink Moon, it's such a wonderful song cycle.

I understand John Martyn had tapes of some of their jams and collaborations. He was Nick's mentor, and Nick would often show up to play together but end up staying for a couple weeks. As with Paul Kossoff, Martyn had difficulties watching such incredibly gifted musicians implode and, again as with Koss, John intentionally held Nick at arms length towards the end due to his erratic behavior.

From what I've gleaned from Martyn's own words, and more recently those of his widow, plus the many liner notes and interviews provided by Joe Boyd and other contemporaries, it seems more that Nick was too troubled and disoriented to conceive of intentionally ending his own life. Hell, I can state from my own experiences, I can forget to take my own heart and NSAID meds for days on end, just as I can forget which pills I'd taken minutes before. Hell, when I recently had pneumonia, I forgot to take my Amoxicillin for three or four days straight! His sis, Gabrielle, seems to have the best- and most honest- account of his death: She's unsure, but very strongly feels Nick was so depressed, confused, that his head wasn't capable of keeping his doses straight. I concur, and wish I'd listened to Northern Sky when I got that sampler decades back. Not that it would have helped because, as I mentioned, his albums were extremely difficult to find.

It's somewhat disappointing that a Volkswagen advert finally brought him some popularity and acclaim on this side of the pond, but I think Nick was way ahead of his time. Not forty years, as he's always been a musician's musician, but Americans are pretty damned thick when it comes to politics and culture. Case in point: Scott or the Walker Bros are still unknown here.

Whether intentional or a tragic oversight, Nick's death robbed culture of one of the most gifted musicians of a generation. Again as with label-mate Koss, he didn't even make it to the 27 club, both having died at 26. Of course, most of those in the 27 club weren't close to his talent. Jimi clearly was, but not Jim Morrison, Janis, Brian Jones, Pigpen, etc.

Great entry to the thread, ChrisAAA. And another nod to Island Records- Nick, Koss/Free, John Martyn, Richard Thompson/Fairport, all labelmates.
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Re: Keddie Oak: Play Your Fave Song Willow, Joan Armatra

Postby dmac » Tue Dec 26, 2017 3:22 am

ChrisAAA and/or anyone else, I namechecked a TV show when first posting about the hammer discovered in April 16. I said, "Detectorist", as in the brilliant UK tv show, "The Detectorists". Penned by Mackenzie Crook (The Office) and starring hizself and Toby Jones (you must find and watch 'Marvelous', another UK tv product), it's just an honest and funny-as-fuck slice-of-life about two awkward pals whose sole purpose in life is love and Roman gold.

They use metal detectors. Hobbyists.

I'd just watched the first series when I was approached by the gentleman who found the hammer in 2015. As a result, I said, "you're a detectorist?" I never would have known the term otherwise.

Now to the punch.

Johnny Flynn wrote the music for the show, and performs the vast majority. Of who does he remind you?



ps Chris, I was a soundman and know what a shit tour smacks of.
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Re: Keddie Oak: Play Your Fave Song Willow, Joan Armatra

Postby dmac » Tue Dec 26, 2017 3:32 am

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Re: Keddie Oak: Play Your Fave Song Willow, Joan Armatra

Postby chrisAAA » Tue Dec 26, 2017 11:01 am

Definitely hear the Nick Drake influence in Flynn's music for Detectorists, which I hadn't heard of but will certainly be sure to watch. Looks like my kind of comedy. I'm a fan of British tv comedy, after discovering it while waiting up for the original shot-on-video Doctor Who to air on my local PBS station as a kid-- Dave Allen, Butterflies, The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin. I caught that Alan Partridge video you posted earlier in the thread.

And a soundman? You've got an extensive knowledge of music and I wondered if you'd worked in it somehow (maybe I missed you referencing working in th biz in another post). Nonetheless, if you've done live sound, I've got no doubt you've got first hand experience with touring: good, bad, and otherwise.

Speaking of touring and comedy, did you watch Steve Coogan's Saxondale? That's a perennial fave.
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Re: Keddie Oak: Play Your Fave Song Willow, Joan Armatra

Postby dmac » Tue Dec 26, 2017 4:39 pm

Anything Coogan. Saxondale's a perennial fave. I have both series (and all Partridge) on my laptops, and often play them to fall asleep to. It's soothing in it's own obnoxious way. I love how he arcs in Saxondale, it's the perfect setting for an 'anger management' sub-story. In one episode, he's jonesing for the old days, pissed that his old compatriot has gone 9-5. He's still hungover in the next ep when 'Father Brown', the great Mark Williams as Deggsy, the diabetic coke fiend, wears his slippers out in one night. Sax ends up eating the cost of a stump to replace his leg.

The funniest in-joke? "Zep?"

I was just walking home, remembering for some reason a cartoon I drew in college. It was in the earliest stages of the roadie shit, and my roommate was the drummer. We packed up all our shit, stored it in the apartment of an old roommate, and toured for six weeks. On our return, we secured a house, set up my stereo and his drums, and put the fx rack in line, and just 'kicked out the jams, motherfuckers!'. If we survived that night, we were okay for that house. No complaints, no cops. Three days later, we were back on the road.

My start in music began in talk radio. At thirteen, I called a local talk station and ended a letter I'd written with passionate yelps of "Mormons suck! Mormons suck!" I was happy as hell it was allowed on the air, because living in Utah amongst the most fake fucking bible-belching assholes is strenuous. Not only did it air, I was put on hold, and the host of the show turned out to be the radio station's PD (program director: boss) He hired me on the spot, at 13, to be a producer.
He's very mormon and is now a Senator. And still a mormon friend. My first day of work was a Thursday, and Colonel Sanders came into the studio. Yeah, him. The very first KFC still operates nearby. Nobody called to ask him Qs, so I had to fake a call. I'd heard a story about him on Paul Harvey's radio bit years prior, and asked him if it was true he'd staked out his ex's place, intent on kidnapping his kids, but got cold feet. He used the money he'd saved for the crime to start up KFC. He said it was true, but it still makes little sense. He did say Sir Harv did over-accentuate things, which was quite literate for what passed as a comatose, bloated white worm in a white suit. Yeah, the vest and the black bow tie.

A year later, I was pulling wires (UPI, AP, those news feeds) when I heard of the Keddie murders on Sunday afternoon. I was fucking there, man.

It's a story I pulled, and it's a story that was dormant in my brain until 2006, when I stumbled across it on the internet and it was said to be "unsolved". I thought, "Bullshit!"

How right I was.

By the time of the murders, I'd learned how to set up interviews with 'stars' in the news, in media, politics. The mighty and powerful on the other end of a WATTS line took me for a girl til my voice broke, so when they asked for a name and I had a girls voice and a boys name, they literally asked for credentials: "Can I speak to your boss?" That kind of shit was soooo funny the first hundred times. Then I realized my nuts weren't dropping according to plan.

I moved over to a sister station that played Top 40, and was transitioning to automation: the ruin of mankind. Mindless hours, so I spent them researching music and listening to and buying shit my station would never play. I was watching PBS furiously back then, including the first-ever broadcast of complete Python episodes, courtesy of Devillier/Donnegan Ent. out of Austin.

I was buying albums like they were going out of style- little did I know. Mott, Fugs, Zombies, Kinks, Who, Maytals, Meters, I bought it all. 8-tracks WERE going out of style. I bought a bootleg of Def Leppard before they were signed, on 8-track, for cents. The masking tape label of "Deaf Lepperd" intrigued me. Most 8s were 25 cents, so I bought an 8-track just to see if the music was cool. I bought "Show Some Emotion" on 8 because I could make out Glyn Johns' name on the bottom of the back label. Glyn? Andy? SOLD!

Then I sought and bought the vinyl.

Best 25 cents ever spent was in discovery.

Kinks. I bought the 77 album, Sleepwalker, and was smitten by the first damned cut. It immediately cut to my nuts: I was an anglophile. I liked Brit TV, my fave bands were Brits, I was watching a buttload of BBC/Thames on PBS, and Graham Chapman was the funniest man alive. So, as per Ray's lyrics, I dreamed up a move to London. In my junior year of high school, I did it. I moved to London, interviewed Pete Townshend, the Kinks, Yardbirds, and three of the Pythons: Two Terrys and a Graham. Lots of other interviews, lots of bands, every night was a new fucking band. REM! Yes, I saw them at the fucking Wardour location of the Marquee, where the Who played! Oh, fuck YEAH! I was alive! I interviewed them at IRS HQ, which was an adjunct of Island off of Portobello Rd, next to the church, Basing St Studios, where so much magic happened. Including the Koss bit I posted above.

Funnily, I was centered around Portobello, shopped there almost daily for the night's grub, when I moved to London in 2000 to start production of what became a BBC/VH-1 co-op about a musical hero of mine. We 'borrowed' costly BBC equipment over weekends, when they wouldn't miss it, then showed them the footage. SOLD!

My ins and outs with music is lifelong, I know a lot of the guys. I've done countless liner notes under assumed names. I've contributed to books. I've done cover art for major releases. I've done PR and rep work, and even fucking managed. One thing leads to another if you pull shit off with a clean bill of health.

My life may not seem grand, but I've packed many acts into this short story. And, as the legend fades to black, it's a short movie...
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Re: Keddie Oak: Play Your Fave Song Willow, Joan Armatra

Postby dmac » Tue Dec 26, 2017 5:09 pm

ChrisAAA, you came off like an Anglo, so I thought you knew of Detectorists.

My best advice is to get close to Ricky Gervais. Watch his two wonderful short offerings of THE OFFICE, which is punctuated quite poignantly with the xmas special. Then watch his two series of EXTRAS, with the obligatory xmas send-off special. The weight he pulls is so fucking cool because he intentionally underutilizes it. Samuel L. Jackson, Patrick Stewart, Bob DeNiro. Everyone is the butt of a cool joke Rick thought.

Gervais makes a name in the US as a host or as the 'originator', but to be understood is to see him in action, playing the exact shit he knows from hard knocks and is playing for entertainment AND enlightenment.

His take on job politics is metoo before hashtags existed.

What's fantastic about Detectorists is Mackenzie Crook, who played Gareth, the brilliant useless fascist from The Office, scripted, sold, and starred in this award-winning mindbender. With Toby Jones, who I have yet to see play poorly. Toby's just brimming. Most Yanks wouldn't know Mackenzie if they watched his clips from the Pirates of the Caribbean films back-to-back, but the Beeb backed him. It paid big, garnering an 8.7 score last time I looked at imdb. Many awards, well deserved. It's a complex of stories and themes, and the level of intelligence is astounding. I just watched the first series for the second time last week and was floored by how much I'd missed in the first round.
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Re: Keddie Oak: Play Your Fave Song Willow, Joan Armatra

Postby chrisAAA » Tue Dec 26, 2017 7:30 pm

Amazing that you were involved in radio as a teenager. That's kind of my story as well.

I grew up in California, went to middle and high school in rural Southern Humboldt County, outside of a tiny little town along the Avenue of the Giants. I left the Bay Area suburbs just about to start the 8th grade thinking moving to the country was about as close to literally going back in time as was possible. , but it turned out to be pretty great for me in a lot of ways I couldn't have anticipated.

A relatively short time after I moved to the area, a non-commercial community radio station was launched. Not affiliated with a college, this little station was purely a passion project for the area locals who had organized and fundraised to get the station on the air. I was fourteen years old at the time and a friend and I were daydreaming out loud about how cool it would be to have our own radio show. A neighbor of my friend that worked at the station heard about our interest and said if we were serious we should come down to the station and give it a try. One Saturday afternoon, we went down to the station, housed in two converted vacation cottages in downtown Garberville, California and did just that. It was a good time and not as complicated to run the studio board as I thought it would be. My friend and I sent in applications to get our official FCC licenses and within a couple of weeks had a weekend 2 hour slot.

The friend didn't end up caring about the radio and faded out of the picture a few months later but I did it all through high school. The station's record collection and the new releases we'd receive gave me a good start on my own lifelong love of music and actually led to me working in the business for a time.

Also impressed that you made your own way to London at a such young age! Sounds like quite an experience from the few details you've shared. Always wanted to live there at least for a time, but the closest I ever really got traveling there as often as I could, either playing music or just to see friends. I guess I'm a bit an Anglophile going back to when I was a kid, fueled mostly by the excellent music an

I've seen all the Ricky Gervais stuff. I loved the original UK The Office after a friend showed the first season while visiting (same friend who'd shown me Steve Coogan's first series of I'm Alan Partridge as well as Tony Ferrino, Paul and Pauline Calf). Definitely going to track down and watch Detectorists.

Finally, it's crazy to think that you first came across the Keddie Murders because you were responsible for pulling stories off the wire service!
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Re: Keddie Oak: Play Your Fave Song Willow, Joan Armatra

Postby dmac » Tue Dec 26, 2017 8:36 pm

Cewl to meet another who knows Benny Hill was rank moron shit. No point escalating into TV when this should stick to our prodigious wealth of music info.

I will carry over with some true anecdotes. I was young when I moved to London, and zits were my hell. Pre-amoxycillin. The Kinks asked more than anyone, "how old are you?!" One by one, they asked. At different times. On the stage, at Konk, at a gig in a urinal, they asked. "Oh, I thought so. You look it, but you act much older".

I took that as the coolest compliment from the band that put me there. Like Townshend asked some weird Qs but nothing like that compliment. Pete was weirded out when we talked, it was at his Boathouse studios. I'm there in April 82, so Pete's moaning about the solo albums ("I definitely took on too much to write solo albums and for the band, the contract is killing me") and talking about sessions for the next LP (It's Hard). He said, "this one is is so important. It has to be right." He's saying the first lp with Jones replacing Moon was fucked. He's saying what? Everything hinges on whether he can write 40 minutes of Who when he doesn't give a fuck about anything but those who he'd hurt by not delivering.

This has nothing to do with anything but voicing something about Trousers few know to mention. He's loose with money. He's not Rod Stewart or Mick Jagger: tight as two coats of paint. Townshend has never given me a pence, but when something happened to a common friend, he put 100,000 pounds right off the mark. When the film I talked about, where we used BBC equipment to sell the film to the BBC, we ran out of cash on the American leg. Pete had also seen the footage, and paid for completion. I cannot even begin to tell you of firsthand knowledge of those he's aided without call.

Many may mock Pete for selling "Love Ain't For Keeping" to a diapar ad, but I can attest to what a genuinely generous guy Pete is.

I know music biz is completely sideways and fucked. Then I look at politics. Not one guy as genuine as Pete Townshend in the batch.

I mentioned Joe Boyd earlier. Look him up. Find imdb and watch the docu he appeared in with Pete. Then wonder how the fuck Joe was at the birthpoint of all the shit he saw and made happen. Look up Joe Boyd, he's the Yank in the story that made all the Brit bands bigger and better in Britain.

To my knowledge, Boyd never tried to take anything to the US. He was fucking amazing. Hendrix Who Fairport Floyd Drake I can't explain how cool that fucker is.

It's implied how important the legendary UK DJ John Peel is in the film I produced, but Boyd and Townshend and Peel all had demonstrable results in the efforts they made to benefit my target. Peel died on holiday just before we were to film him. John rarely submitted to interviews, much less film. John Peel is the most perfect rock mind in history. Glyn Johns has too much brain dedicated to wines.

Sorry if I went a tad sideways, but it was stream-of-consciousness, and not riddled with newly-mined cussings. A win in the dmac column any day of the year.

I asked what he thought of a recent screening of Holy Grail. Terry Gilliam said he only sees the faults when he looks back, so he tries to look forward. He was recutting Jabbewocky. That is still a perfect answer, and I feel it almost daily.

This actually happened to me: I interviewed my hero, then went to kONK sTUDIOS and interviewed a Kink. The next day I'm at Si Kirke's house, the drummer for Bad Company. Ronnie Wood drops by. I said, "Ron, I was just at your mate's flat" He didn't believe me, called me a cheeky monkey fucker. That was a month before he and Si made the cover of Rolling Stone, and about 20 years before Woody knew we were real and he went digging into his Irish caves for outtakes and one song nobody found.

True fucking story.

Ronnie Wood asked Bo Diddley to learn a new chord, just an extension of something Bo used. Bo said. "I know three chords, and I ain't done with them yet".

Fucking purrfect.

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Re: Keddie Oak: Play Your Fave Song Willow, Joan Armatra

Postby dmac » Tue Dec 26, 2017 11:08 pm

Back to music. Listen to this BRILLIANT artist and, afterwords, scroll down to read the outcome.




Early last year he was listed as missing. His body was found at shore. A funeral was held, the online videos show how highly he was loved by family and friends.

I pegged he'd committed suicide. I asked online, and a dear friend who helped make the documentary and knew him wouldn't commit to cause of death. Silence. Yeah, that incredibly talented, and it was suicide.

This is Ireland. No drugs involved, not even Ronnie Wood's downfall, Guinness. This talented guy topped himself for no known reason. Everything he said in the song pronounced understanding. He defied logic.

This shit pisses me off. Big time.

We spend so much time on Tina. What if we focused more on realistic goals? Saving suicides. I've stopped two that I know of. It's no uglier than anything PCSO photographed.

Aww, fuck...
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